Details

Guide to Good Practice in the Management of Time in Major Projects


Guide to Good Practice in the Management of Time in Major Projects

Dynamic Time Modelling
2. Aufl.

59,99 €

Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 02.02.2018
ISBN/EAN: 9781119428459
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 248

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Beschreibungen

A practical treatise on the processes and standards required for the effective time management of major construction projects  This book uses logical step-by-step procedures and examples from inception and risk appraisal—through design and construction to testing and commissioning—to show how an effective and dynamic time model can be used to manage the risk of delay in the completion of construction projects. Integrating with the CIOB major projects contract, the new edition places increased emphasis on the dynamic time model as the way to manage time and cost in major projects, as opposed to the use of a static target baseline program. It includes a new chapter distinguishing the principal features of the dynamic time model and its development throughout the life of a project from inception to completion. Guide to Good Practice in the Management of Time in Major Projects—Dynamic Time Modelling, 2nd Edition features new appendices covering matters such as complexity in construction and engineering projects, productivity guides (including specific references to the UK, Australia, and the USA), and a number of case studies dealing with strategic time management and high-density, resource-based scheduling.  Provides guidance for the strategic  management of time in construction and civil engineering projects Demonstrates how to use a dynamic time model to manage time pro-actively in building and civil engineering projects Sets out processes and standards to be achieved ensuring systematic documentation and quality control of time management Integrates with the CIOB major projects contract Guide to Good Practice in the Management of Time in Major Projects—Dynamic Time Modelling, 2nd Edition is an ideal handbook for project and program management professionals working on civil engineering and construction projects, including those from contractors, clients, and project management consultants.  
Preface xi Introduction to Second Edition xiii Acknowledgements xv Table of Figures xvii 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Core principles of time management 1 1.2 The dynamic time model 4 1.3 Mission statement 6 1.4 Genesis of the Guide 7 1.5 Purpose of the Guide 7 1.6 Risk management 8 1.7 Planning and scheduling 9 1.8 The planning method statement 10 1.9 The project scheduler 10 1.10 Time management 11 1.11 Building information modelling 12 2 Strategy 13 2.1 Planning method statement strategy 13 2.2 Consultant and contractor selection strategy 14 2.3 Contracting strategy 15 2.4 Project planning strategy 16 2.5 Progress record strategy 17 2.6 Schedule design strategy 18 2.7 Schedule update strategy 18 2.8 Schedule revision strategy 19 2.9 Time risk management strategy 20 2.10 Schedule quality control strategy 22 2.11 Building information modelling strategy 22 2.12 Communication strategy 23 3 The dynamic time model 25 3.1 Introduction 25 3.2 The initial development schedule 27 3.3 The updated development schedule 28 3.4 Calculating the predicted effect of intervening events on the development schedule 30 3.5 Planning to overcome the predicted effects of an intervening event 31 3.6 Revision of the development schedule 32 3.7 Time management of pre-construction activities 33 3.8 The initial working schedule 33 3.9 The updated working schedule 34 3.10 Calculating the predicted effect of intervening events on the working schedule 36 3.11 Planning to overcome the predicted effects of an intervening event 37 3.12 Revision of the working schedule 38 3.13 Continuing time management of construction activities 39 3.14 Benchmarking 40 4 Developing the dynamic time model 41 4.1 Introduction 41 4.2 Schedule density design 42 Scheduling at Low Density 43 Scheduling at Medium Density 43 Scheduling at High Density 44 4.3 Planning method statement 44 Planning method statement at Low Density 45 Planning method statement at Medium Density 46 Planning method statement at High Density 46 Documentation of corrections 46 4.4 Software considerations 47 4.5 The structure of the schedule 48 4.6 Schedule types 48 The Development schedule 49 Tender schedule 49 Working schedule 49 Occupational commissioning schedule 50 As-built schedule 50 4.7 Schedule design 50 4.8 Schedule integration 51 Schedule subcontracting 52 Master schedule and subproject 52 Milestone management 53 4.9 Risk and contingencies 53 Contingencies at Low Density 54 Contingencies at Medium Density 56 Contingencies at High Density 56 4.10 Scheduling techniques 56 Bar charts 57 Line-of-balance diagram 57 Time chainage diagram 58 Arrow diagram method (ADM) 59 Precedence diagram method (PDM) 60 Linked bar chart 61 Building information modelling 61 4.11 Work breakdown structure 62 4.12 Schedule communication 64 Executive summary report 66 Senior management report 66 Project manager’s report 66 Section manager’s report 66 Short-term look-ahead report 67 4.13 Calendars 67 Calendars at Low Density 70 Calendars at Medium Density 70 Calendars at High Density 70 4.14 Work type definition 70 4.15 Activity identifier coding 70 Activity ID at Low Density 71 Activity ID at Medium Density 71 Activity ID at High Density 71 Activity ID trailing numbers 72 Simplified Activity ID 73 4.16 Activity description 74 Descriptions at Low Density 74 Descriptions at Medium Density 74 Descriptions at High Density 74 4.17 Activity content codes 75 4.18 Activity cost codes 76 Cost coding at Low Density 77 Cost coding at Medium Density 77 Cost coding at High Density 77 4.19 Activity duration 78 Estimating durations using industry standards 79 Estimating durations using benchmarking 79 Estimating activity duration by comparison with other projects 79 Calculating activity duration from resources and work content 80 Specified activity duration 80 Activity duration at Low Density 81 Activity durations at Medium Density 81 Activity durations at High Density 81 4.20 Resource scheduling 82 Resources at Low Density and Medium Density 83 Resources at High Density 83 Strategic resource allocation 85 4.21 Permits and licences 86 4.22 Utilities and third-party projects 87 4.23 Schedule logic 87 Engineering logic 87 Preferential logic 88 Resource logic 88 Zonal logic 88 4.24 Density logic 88 4.25 Activity logic 89 Start-to-start 89 Finish-to-finish 89 Finish-to-start 90 Start-to-finish 90 Computational inconsistencies 90 4.26 Lags 90 Lagged finish-to-finish 91 Lagged finish-to-start 91 Lagged start-to-start 92 Lagged start-to-start and finish-to-finish 92 Negative lag 93 Lags at Low Density 93 Lags at Medium Density 93 Lags at High Density 93 4.27 Logical constraints 94 Flexible constraints 94 Moderate constraints 94 Inflexible constraints 95 Inflexible combinations of constraints 96 4.28 Float 96 Free float 97 Total float 97 Negative float 97 4.29 Critical path 97 4.30 Schedule quality assurance 99 Review for buildability 100 Review for schedule content 100 Review for schedule integrity 102 Review for constraints 103 Review for open ends 103 Review for long lags 103 Review for negative lags 104 Review for ladders 104 Review for scheduling options 105 Review for critical paths 105 5 Managing the dynamic time model 107 5.1 Introduction 107 5.2 Data communication systems 109 5.3 Building information modelling 110 5.4 Record-keeping 111 Spreadsheet-recorded data 111 Database-recorded data 111 Record types 114 5.5 Progress records 114 Progress record content 114 Activity identification data 115 Activity description 115 Date of record 115 The resource 115 Start and finish dates 116 Author of the record 116 Progress data 116 Quality control records 117 Information flow records 117 5.6 Updating the schedule 118 5.7 Schedule review and revision 119 Review for better information 120 Better design information 120 Better procurement information 120 Refinements to work content 120 Review for short-term work 120 Change in methodology 121 Repetitive activities 121 Change in activity descriptions 122 Change in activity durations 122 Change in logic 122 Change in cost profile 122 Consequential change in criticality 123 5.8 Change control 124 Identifying intervening events 124 Voluntary and implied variations and other instructed changes 126 Variations 126 Prime cost and provisional sums 126 Employer’s acts or omissions 127 Acts or omissions of third parties 129 Neutral events 129 Disruption 129 Calculating the effect of intervening events 129 5.9 Progress monitoring 131 Schedule comparison 131 Baseline target schedule (static) 132 Variable baseline target (dynamic) 133 Delay caused by a contractor’s risk event 133 Delay caused by an employer’s risk event 134 Jagged line 134 Count the squares 134 Milestone monitoring 135 Cash-flow monitoring 136 Earned-value management 136 Resource monitoring 138 Building information modelling 138 5.10 Acceleration and recovery 138 6 Communicating the dynamic time model 141 6.1 Introduction 141 6.2 Proactive communication: promoting the plan 141 6.3 Reactive communication: reporting 142 6.4 Report types 143 Contractual notice 143 Managerial reports 145 Executive summary 145 6.5 Reporting formats 147 6.6 Feedback and benchmarking 147 APPENDICES 151 Appendix 1 – Time risks which may be borne by the employer 151 Appendix 2 – Case studies in strategic planning 155 Appendix 3 – The nature of complex projects 167 Appendix 4 – The dynamic time model – a flow chart 169 Appendix 5 – Case studies in high density scheduling contents 171 Appendix 6 – Desirable attributes of scheduling software 177 Appendix 7 – Industry productivity guides 187 Appendix 8 – Sample notice of delay 189 Glossary of terms 191 Index 213
The Chartered Institute of Building is at the heart of a management career in construction. It is the world's largest and most influential professional body for construction management and leadership, with a Royal Charter to promote the science and practice of building and construction for the benefit of society. With over 46,000 members worldwide, the CIOB is the international voice of the building professional.
A practical treatise on the processes and standards required for the effective time management of major construction projects This book uses logical step-by-step procedures and examples from inception and risk appraisal—through design and construction to testing and commissioning—to show how an effective and dynamic time model can be used to manage the risk of delay in the completion of construction projects. Integrating with the CIOB major projects contract, the new edition places increased emphasis on the dynamic time model as the way to manage time and cost in major projects, as opposed to the use of a static target baseline program. It includes a new chapter distinguishing the principal features of the dynamic time model and its development throughout the life of a project from inception to completion. Guide to Good Practice in the Management of Time in Major Projects—Dynamic Time Modelling, 2nd Edition features new appendices covering matters such as complexity in construction and engineering projects, productivity guides (including specific references to the UK, Australia, and the USA), and a number of case studies dealing with strategic time management and high-density, resource-based scheduling. Provides guidance for the strategic management of time in construction and civil engineering projects. Demonstrates how to use a dynamic time model to manage time pro-actively in building and civil engineering projects Sets out processes and standards to be achieved ensuring systematic documentation and quality control of time management Integrates with the CIOB major projects contract Guide to Good Practice in the Management of Time in Major Projects—Dynamic Time Modelling, 2nd Edition is an ideal handbook for project and program management professionals working on civil engineering and construction projects, including those from contractors, clients, and project management consultants.

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