Details

A Companion to Philosophical Logic


A Companion to Philosophical Logic


Blackwell Companions to Philosophy 1. Aufl.

von: Dale Jacquette

100,10 €

Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 15.04.2008
ISBN/EAN: 9781405149945
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 832

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Beschreibungen

This collection of newly comissioned essays by international contributors offers a representative overview of the most important developments in contemporary philosophical logic.<br /> <ul class="noindent"> <li>Presents controversies in philosophical implications and applications of formal symbolic logic.<br /> </li> <li>Surveys major trends and offers original insights.</li> </ul>
Preface. <p>Acknowledgments.</p> <p>List of Contributors.</p> <p>Introduction: Logic, Philosophy, and Philosophical Logic. (Dale Jacquette).</p> <p><b>Part I: Historical Development of Logic.</b></p> <p>1. Ancient Greek Philosophical Logic. (Robin Smith).</p> <p>2. History of Logic: Medieval. (B.G. Sundholm and E.P. Bos).</p> <p>3. The Rise of Modern Logic. (Rolf George and James Van Evra).</p> <p><b>Part II. Symbolic Logic and Ordinary Language.</b></p> <p>4. Language, Logic, and Form. (Kent Bach).</p> <p>5. Puzzles About Intensionality. (Nathan Salmon).</p> <p>6. Symbolic Logic and Natural Language. (Emma Borg and Ernest Lepore).</p> <p><b>Part III: Philosophical Dimensions of Logical Paradoxes.</b></p> <p>7. Logical Paradoxes. (James Cargile).</p> <p>8. Semantical and Logical Paradox. (Keith Simmons).</p> <p>9. Philosophical Implications of Logical Paradoxes. (Roy A. Sorensen).</p> <p><b>Part IV: Truth and Definite Description in Semantic Analysis.</b></p> <p>10. Truth, the Liar, and Tarski's Semantics. (Gila Sher).</p> <p>11. Truth, the Liar, and Tarskian Truth Definition. (Greg Ray).</p> <p>12. Descriptions and Logical Form. (Gary Ostertag).</p> <p>13. Russell's Theory of Definite Descriptions as a Paradigm for Philosophy. (Gregory Landini).</p> <p><b>Part V: Concepts of Logical Consequence.</b></p> <p>14. Necessity, Meaning, and Rationality: The Notion of Logical Consequence. (Stewart Shapiro).</p> <p>15. Varieties of Consequence . (B.G. Sundholm).</p> <p>16. Modality of Deductively Valid Inference . (Dale Jacquette).</p> <p><b>Part VI Logic, Existence, and Ontology.</b></p> <p>17. Quantifiers, Being and Canonical Notation. (Paul Gochet).</p> <p>18. From Logic to Ontology: Some Problems of Predication, Negation and Possibility. (Herbert Hochberg).</p> <p>19. Putting Language First: The "Liberation" of Logic from Ontology. (Ermanno Bencivenga).</p> <p><b>Part VII: Metatheory and the Scope and Limits of Logic.</b></p> <p>20. Metatheory. (Alasdair Urquhart).</p> <p>21. Metatheory of Logics and the Characterization Problem. (Jan Wolenski).</p> <p>22. Logic in Finite Structures: Definability, Complexity, and Randomness. (Scott Weinstein).</p> <p><b>Part VIII: Logical Foundations of Set Theory and Mathematics.</b></p> <p>23. Logic and Ontology: Numbers and Sets. (José Benardete).</p> <p>24. Logical Foundations of Set Theory and Mathematics. (Mary Tiles) 25. Property-Theoretic Foundations of Mathematics. (Michael Jubien).</p> <p><b>Part IX: Modal Logics and Semantics.</b></p> <p>26. Modal Logic. (Johan van Benthem).</p> <p>27. First Order Alethic Modal Logic. (Melvin Fitting).</p> <p>28. Proofs and Expressiveness in Alethic Modal Logic. (Maarten de Rijke and Heinrich Wansing).</p> <p>29. Alethic Modal Logics and Semantics. (Gerhard Schurz.</p> <p>30. Epistemic Logic. (Nicholas Rescher).</p> <p>31. Deontic, Epistemic, and Temporal Modal Logics. (Risto Hilpinen).</p> <p><b>Part X: Intuitionistic, Free, and Many-Valued Logics.</b></p> <p>32. Intuitionism. (Dirk van Dalen and Mark van Atten).</p> <p>33. Many-Valued, Free, and Intuitionistic Logics. (Richard Grandy).</p> <p>34. Many-Valued Logic. (Grzegorz Malinowski).</p> <p><b>Part XI: Inductive, Fuzzy, and Quantum Probability Logics.</b></p> <p>35. Inductive Logic . (Stephen Glaister).</p> <p>36. Heterodox Probability Theory. (Peter Forrest).</p> <p>37. Why Fuzzy Logic?. (Petr Hájek).</p> <p><b>Part XII: Relevance and Paraconsistent Logics.</b></p> <p>38. Relevance Logic. (Edwin Mares).</p> <p>39. Paraconsistency. (Bryson Brown).</p> <p>40. Logicians Setting Together Contradictories: A Perspective on Relevance, Paraconsistency, and Dialetheism. (Graham Priest).</p> <p><b>Part XIII: Logic, Machine Theory, and Cognitive Science.</b></p> <p>41. The Logical and the Physical. (Andrew W. Hodges).</p> <p>42. Modern Logic and its Role in the Study of Knowledge. (Peter A. Flach).</p> <p>43. Actions and Normative Positions. A Modal-Logical Approach . (Robert Demolomb and Andrew J.I. Jones).</p> <p><b>Part XIV: Mechanization of Logical Inference and Proof Discovery.</b></p> <p>44. The Automation of Sound Reasoning and Successful Proof Finding. (Larry Wos and Branden Fitelson).</p> <p>45. A Computational Logic for Applicative Common LISP. (J. Strother Moore and Matt Kaufmann).</p> <p>46. Sampling Labelled Deductive Systems. (D.M. Gabbay).</p> <p>Resources for Further.</p> <p>Index.</p>
"Here is a first-class collection of articles by a first-class collection of authors. It covers the full range of philosophical logic from its history through its philosophy to its applications, with a lot of good, solid logic all along the way. Of particular value is the way it presents multiple voices on common topics. This is the way philosophy should be done." <i>Lou Goble, Willamette University</i>
<b><br /> </b> <p><b>Dale Jacquette</b> is Professor of Philosophy at the Pennsylvania State University. He is the author of <i>Philosophy of Mind</i> (1994), <i>Meinongian Logic: The Semantics of Existence and Nonexistence</i> (1996), <i>Wittgenstein's Thought in Transition</i> (1998), <i>Symbolic Logic</i> (2001), <i>David Hume's Critique of Infinity</i> (2001), and <i>On Boole: Logic as Algebra</i> (2001), as well as numerous articles on logic, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and Wittgenstein. He is editor of <i>Philosophy of Mathematics: An Anthology</i> (Blackwell 2001) and <i>Philosophy of Logic: An Anthology</i> (Blackwell 2001).</p>
This collection of newly commissioned essays by international contributors offers a representative overview of the most important developments in contemporary philosophical logic. Written by experts from a variety of different logical and philosophical perspectives, the volume presents controversies in philosophical implications and applications of formal symbolic logic. <br /> <p>Each section features contributors currently active in research who explain the central ideas of their special field and take a philosophical stand on recent issues in the intersection of logic and analytic philosophy. Taken together, the essays survey major trends and offer original insights to advance research and philosophical discussion. <i>A Companion to Philosophical Logic</i> provides a comprehensive state-of-the-art handbook for students and professional researchers in philosophical logic.</p>
"Here is a first-class collection of articles by a first-class collection of authors. It covers the full range of philosophical logic from its history through its philosophy to its applications, with a lot of good, solid logic all along the way. Of particular value is the way it presents multiple voices on common topics. This is the way philosophy should be done." <i>Lou Goble, Willamette University</i>

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