Details

Beyond Cartesian Dualism


Beyond Cartesian Dualism

Encountering Affect in the Teaching and Learning of Science.
Contemporary Trends and Issues in Science Education, Band 29

von: Steve Alsop

130,89 €

Verlag: Springer
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 15.02.2006
ISBN/EAN: 9781402038082
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 198

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Beschreibungen

There is surprisingly little known about affect in science education. Despite periodic forays into monitoring students’ attitudes-toward-science, the effect of affect is too often overlooked. Beyond Cartesian Dualism gathers together contemporary theorizing in this axiomatic area. In fourteen chapters, senior scholars of international standing use their knowledge of the literature and empirical data to model the relationship between cognition and affect in science education. Their revealing discussions are grounded in a broad range of educational contexts including school classrooms, universities, science centres, travelling exhibits and refugee camps, and explore an array of far reaching questions. What is known about science teachers’ and students’ emotions? How do emotions mediate and moderate instruction? How might science education promote psychological resilience? How might educators engage affect as a way of challenging existing inequalities and practices?
This book will be an invaluable resource for anybody interested in science education research and more generally in research on teaching, learning and affect. It offers educators and researchers a challenge, to recognize the mutually constitutive nature of cognition and affect.
General Preface
Acknowledgements
Contributors
Introduction: Science Education and Affect. Bridging the Cartesian divide: Science education and affect-Steve Alsop. The importance of affect in science education-Michael J. Reiss. Incalculable Precision: Psychoanalysis and the measure of emotion-Alice Pitt.-
Section One: Students’ Attitudes, Hopes and Dispositions. Attitudes toward science: A review of the field -Martina Nieswandt. The shifting roles of acceptance and dispositions in understanding biological evolution-Sherry Southerland and Gale Sinatra. Empowered for action? How do young people relate to environmental challenges?-Camilla Schreiner and Svein Sjøberg.-
Section Two: Teaching, Learning and Affect. Student learning in science classrooms: What role does motivation play-Christina Rhee, Toni Kempler, Akane Zusho, Brian Coppola and Paul Pintrich. Practical work and the affective domain: What do we know, what should we ask and what is worth exploring further-Jerry Wellington. Museums, affect and cognition: The view from another window-Lynn Dierking. Emotions and science teaching: Present research and future agendas-Michalinos Zembylas.-
Section Three: Pedagogical Interventions. Active science for child refugees-Frederic Perrier. Orchestrating the confluence: A discussion of science, passion and poetry-Michael Watts. From despair to success: A case study of support and transformation in an elementary science practicum-Bonnie Shapiro. Emotional development, science and co-education-Brian Matthews.
There is surprisingly little known about affect in science education. Despite periodic forays into monitoring students’ attitudes-toward-science, the effect of affect is too often overlooked. Beyond Cartesian Dualism gathers together contemporary theorizing in this axiomatic area. In fourteen chapters, senior scholars of international standing use their knowledge of the literature and empirical data to model the relationship between cognition and affect in science education. Their revealing discussions are grounded in a broad range of educational contexts including school classrooms, universities, science centres, travelling exhibits and refugee camps, and explore an array of far reaching questions. What is known about science teachers’ and students’ emotions? How do emotions mediate and moderate instruction? How might science education promote psychological
resilience? How might educators engage affect as a way of challenging existing inequalities and practices?

This book will be an invaluable resource for anybody interested in science education research and more generally in research on teaching, learning and affect. It offers educators and researchers a challenge, to recognize the mutually constitutive nature of cognition and affect.

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